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Med School for Writers: Color blindness

Med School for Writers: Color blindness

Color blindness—it’s all about the genes, baby. Recently, a writer asked me about color blindness. Color blindness is usually congenital (actually hereditary) and much more common in boys, since it is usually X linked. Women have two X chromosomes and usually only one is defective (a gene that codes for color vision). We all have two genes for each of thousands of traits, one from mom, one from dad. If a man has a defective gene on the X chromosome,…

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Med School 101 for writers: A Gunshot Wound to the Spine

Med School 101 for writers: A Gunshot Wound to the Spine

In a photo only the visible foreground information is used to generate the image. By contrast, in an x-ray, all of the information in the frame (hidden or not to the naked eye) is used to generate the image…

How I get into your head—with both pen & scalpel

How I get into your head—with both pen & scalpel

Med School 101 for writers: the mentality of surgeons and writers My day job is a fairly severe mistress, consuming my time with a vengeance matched only by the concentration required to complete many of my daily tasks. That may not sound like much, until I tell you that what I do between 9 and 5—well, more like 7 and 7 most days—is crack skulls.  No, I am not a bouncer at some hellishly belligerent bar, though I do have…

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Med School 101: Shock for writers

Med School 101: Shock for writers

A simple conception of shock is this. Think of the body as nothing more than a self contained hydraulic system, with the heart as the pump at the center of it all. The arteries and veins are the tubes and pipes through which the hydraulic fluid passes…

The Least Detailed Plans of a Great & Complicated Apparatus

The Least Detailed Plans of a Great & Complicated Apparatus

The Least Detailed Plans of a Great & Complicated Apparatus An ancient skull gradually subsumes Dr. Jolly Frye’s time, talents—and mind. Is it possession, madness, or something else altogether? Tales of the Bloody Scalpel are compelling, haunting, stand alone fiction informed by medicine and surgery, but rarely actually about medicine or surgery. Most, though not all, could be classified as supernatural medical thrillers. They contain elements of horror, the paranormal, ghosts, madness, monsters, fear of the unknown, or occasionally just…

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August Heat

August Heat

by William Fryer Harvey This brief story was first published in 1910. Though subtle, many consider it one of the finest precognition stories ever written. Enjoy. Narrated by Edison McDaniels

The Flatliner

The Flatliner

A fallen researcher becomes obsessed with a single question: Do the dead think? An all new tale of supernatural medical suspense well calculated to keep you shivering!

Just finished this one tonight. A truly awesome telling of The Battle of Antietam from the Southern viewpoint. Available now on Audible! Posted 3/12/2019

THE ABSOLUTION OF OTTO FINKEL

THE ABSOLUTION OF OTTO FINKEL

 THE ABSOLUTION OF OTTO FINKEL by John R. McKay. NOW AVAILABLE ON AUDIBLE! This historical novel tells the story of five boys, joined forever in the misery of a shared moment in childhood. Though only one is scarred physically, the ramifications of that terrible day reverberate years later for each of them. This is an epic telling of the momentous choices life offers, and the selections we make when pressed in the most extreme conditions imaginable. The stage of…

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Audiobook narrator Edison McDaniels reviews ‘I am perhaps dying’

Audiobook narrator Edison McDaniels reviews ‘I am perhaps dying’

I AM PERHAPS DYING: The Medical Backstory of Spinal Tuberculosis Hidden in the Civil War Diary of Leroy Wiley Gresham by Dennis Rasbach, MD, FACS A scholarly yet imminently readable and fascinating account of a twenty-first century surgeon’s analysis and perspective on the medical care and musings of one Leroy Wiley Gresham. If you read nothing else about medicine in the nineteenth century, read this. If you have no interest in medicine in the nineteenth century, read this. Leroy Gresham…

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